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Flash Panoramas, the more the merrier.


The beginnings

In the beginning there was QuickTimeVR. Or was it ptviewer? Those were the days! At the turn of the millenium fans of both technologies fought endless verbal battles about which one is best to display their full spherical artwork. Then two things happened that left them in the cold:

  • now defunct iPix forced Helmut Dersch to pull the plug on panotools and ptviewer. The first Open Source panorama authoring and publishing solution survived thanks to the contributions of Fulvio Senore (ptviewer) Jim Watters, Bruno Postle, Daniel M. German and other contributors (panotools). Helmut’s software was ahead of time. He is now back in the community with new ideas.
  • business logic at Apple pulled the plug on QTVR development. It has lingered unsupported inside QuickTime, until recent updates crippled some functionality dear to VR-artists.

Life went on

  • Starting with the release of Windows XP Service Pack 1, Microsoft removed Java from its system and initiated Java’s decline in ubiquity. It has continuously lost market share since then and is now down at about 84%. Ten years after the inception of the web there was no widely deployed standard yet to display VR content!
  • 3D accelerated video cards became mainstream, and with them the market share of Adobe Shockwave increased too. Probably the first 3D accelerated panorama viewer, SPi-V was released November 22 2004 by Aldo Hoeben.
  • A flurry of viewing technologies came and went. None of them achieved more than single-digit market share. Noteworthy is DevalVR that attracted a passionate following of discerning users for its smooth panning and small footprint.

A new Open Source viewer is born September 14, 2005 when Pablo d’Angelo starts the FreePV Open Source Panoramic Viewer Project with Fulvio Senore and Thomas Rauscher. It is the first viewer to play QTVR on Linux and raises a lot o

f hopes in the community. A Google Summer of Code 2007 project by Leon Moctezuma added SPi-V playing capabilities, but the viewer is still experimental and suffers of the same problem the flurry of other viewing technologies: lack of market penetration. Keep fingers crossed, this year it may become a Google Summer of Code again, integration with the VLC media player.

Flash to the rescue!

flash logo

Flash based panorama players have existed for a while, though most of them did not correct perspective properly and where apt for either flat pictures (like Zoomify), or for cylindrical panoramas.

With the arrival of Flash 8 in August 2005 (although Linux users had to wait until January 2007, when Flash 9 for Linux was released), full spherical panoramas became possible. First generation full spherical players include Thomas Rauscher’s Pano2QTVR and Immervision’s PurePlayer Flash. Flash 8 was not completely up to the challenge yet. The audience reported seeing snakes instead of straight line.

With Flash 9 quality improved dramatically. Denis V. Chumakov’s FPP became the most popular Flash 9 player.

Flash is the most widely distributed plugin, with a market penetration of 98%. Adobe has done almost everything right to get Flash widely accepted. It’s a unique value proposition of ubiquity, features and flexibility.

In March 2007 I predicted a mushrooming of Flash based panorama viewers within 12-18 month, similarly to Flash based mp3 players. Today, Patrick Cheatham and Zephyr Renner made my prediction come true with the release of an Open Source viewer based on the Papervision3D engine. I hope it is the start of a growing community effort.

Meanwhile, Adobe works on Flash 10 that will include hardware accelerated 3D. Exciting times ahead!

3 Responses

  1. Argggh, why do people roll their own ‘open source’ licenses: “We submit them with the same spirit of the Open Source rights allowances, with one caveat — you cannot sell what we’ve got here, whether in whole in part or repackaged”

  2. Hi Bruno:

    Argggh, we changed it to a more accepted licensing scheme. Thanks again for the pointer to the OSI, et cetera.

    But, to answer your question: 1) because I was trying to be succinct, and 2) I was fairly unfamiliar with ‘open source’ licenses. No longer… :-)

  3. VideoLAN may become a free alternative to view panoramas.

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