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Hugin 2010.4.0beta1 released.


Hugin 2010 Logo

Yesterday I released the first tarball in the new Hugin release cycle.  The goal is to release 2010.4.0 before the end of the year.

It’s only a couple of months since the last release, but a lot has changed, in the code, in the process, and in the infrastructure.

I wrote about the infrastructure change three days ago.  The activity in the new bug tracker is massive.

In the code, the most important news is that with its own brand new control points detector, Hugin can be considered feature-complete.

To underscore this achievement, the project has given itself a new look, contributed by Cristian Marchi, that has given an evolutive face lift to the original design by Dr. Luca Vascon whose source files have been lost in time.

In terms of process, this time around we have more contributors than ever, on multiple disparate platforms.  The project will still stick to its policy of releasing source code as soon as it is good to go and leaving it up to the user communities on the different platforms to produce and distribute binaries because it does not make sense to delay the release of source code only because there are no binaries; and it does not make sense to delay the release of binaries for a platform with faster builders only because there are no binaries yet on other platforms.  However the natural and inevitable time lag between a released source package and a working binary package (which is what most users are looking forward to) is likely to be reduced for most platforms.

First to respond to my call was Matthew Petroff.  He made Windows binaries in four variations (32bit/64bit, installer and standalone zipped) available within a few hours and before anybody else.  Matthew has joined the team recently and he has done some excellent polishing work on the Windows side of thing.

Then the indefatigable Harry van der Wolf followed up.  Building for OSX is always a little bit different/special and require more effort than most other platforms.  He reported this morning that everything works and will produce the coveted bundle installer tomorrow.  What would Hugin Mac users do without Harry?

Andreas Metzler reported a “work for me” update to the Debian experimental source package.  Based on his work I will try to produce my first Ubuntu packages of Hugin for Ubuntu Lucid (my main system) and Jaunty (chrooted), and Gerry Patterson will tag-team for Maverick.

On the Fedora front things are quiet but not less up to date.  Between Bruno Postle and Terry Duell recent versions of Fedora should be covered soon.

Lukáš Jirkovský will try to use OpenSuSE Build Service, but he’s very busy and there is no guarantee.

No promises.  There is always an inevitable lag between the release of a source tarball and that of a usable binary – at minimum the time it takes for the builder to download the tarball, build it, run a minimal test, and publish it.  But we are doing our best to make this the Hugin release with the shortest delay from source to binary.

This weekend is a test run.  The really interesting run will be when we approach the final release.  Keep your champagne cold for now.

And when will somebody report success building Hugin on Android or iOS?

2 Responses

  1. It would be really great if there were RPM packages for OpenSUSE. I tried to build it, but autopano-sift-c stopped working with my packages, so I had to downgrade again.

  2. the instructions for the OpenSUSE build could use some attention indeed.

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