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Hugin 2010.4.0 Officially Released

Today I declared the Hugin build released a few days ago final. It is dedicated to Milko K. Amorth, a pioneer of the full spherical panoramic photography that we have lost last year under tragic circumstances.  He will be missed.

This release of Hugins brings a load of new features.  The two most notable are the result of two Google Summer of Code (GSoC) 2010 projects:

The built in control point generator cpfind was the is the GSoC project of Antoine Deleforge, built on top of more than three years of contributions made by too many people to list here.  For the first time Hugin is “feature complete”.  This does not mean that there are no new features coming.  It only means that it is now possible to run the typical stitching workflow end-to-end without relying on third party non-Free packages.

The new underlying controller, Makefilelib, the GSoC project of Florian Achleitner.  Users of the GUI won’t notice, but it enables a more robust stitching process, distribution on multiple stitching nodes, finer grained control and extension of the process through other third party tools controlled by the same Makefile.

More information in the release notes.

Another first: the user-community around Hugin is growing and the user-contributed binaries are already available or will be available shortly after the source code release.  Many Thanks to everybody who has contributed to this great release cycle, particularly to Matthew Petroff for the Windows builds and to Harry van der Wolf for the OSX builds.

Hugin 2010.4.0beta2

Right on the heel of the first beta, here is the second beta in this release cycle.  It’s only one week since the first beta, but a lot of effort has gone into translations and bug fixes.  The changes since beta1 are summarized in the release announcement.

Once again the leading users have responded to the call and built binaries for their respective platforms.  Not that it is a competition, but this sounds almost like the results of a race with Harry van der Wolf coming in first with builds for Mac OSX, followed closely by Andreas Metzler’s Debian/experimental and Matthew Petroff with builds for Windows.  Extra bonus for Matthew who published his builds on our SourceForge page.  Uploading to SourceForge is easy and if your SSH-Key is correctly set in their system you don’t even need to enter a password.  Just start a command line and type something like

rsync --partial --progress -e ssh hugin-2010.4.0beta2.tar.bz2 yuv,hugin@frs.sourceforge.net:/home/frs/project/h/hu/hugin/hugin/hugin-2010.4_beta/

No such problems for users of platforms with proper package management system.

Bruno published Fedora builds at the usual location and I used Andreas’ Debian packages to publish Ubuntu builds for Lucid and Karmic in the Hugin PPA on Launchpad.  Moreover I tried a Soyuz feature and copied the Lucid source from the Hugin PPA to my personal PPA where it built successfully for Natty.  I  don’t have a Natty install yet so I can’t really test if it worked.

Next scheduled release is a release candidate for December 17.  Maybe an additional beta before that if further testing is required.  I don’t want to push too much on the builders.  The build mechanisms are oiled and ready.  If the performance of the last two beta releases is an indication for the future, this may be the first Hugin release to shrink the lag between source code release and binary release to less than 48 hours.

For now, happy bug fixing!

Hugin 2010.4.0beta1 released.

Hugin 2010 Logo

Yesterday I released the first tarball in the new Hugin release cycle.  The goal is to release 2010.4.0 before the end of the year.

It’s only a couple of months since the last release, but a lot has changed, in the code, in the process, and in the infrastructure.

I wrote about the infrastructure change three days ago.  The activity in the new bug tracker is massive.

In the code, the most important news is that with its own brand new control points detector, Hugin can be considered feature-complete.

To underscore this achievement, the project has given itself a new look, contributed by Cristian Marchi, that has given an evolutive face lift to the original design by Dr. Luca Vascon whose source files have been lost in time.

In terms of process, this time around we have more contributors than ever, on multiple disparate platforms.  The project will still stick to its policy of releasing source code as soon as it is good to go and leaving it up to the user communities on the different platforms to produce and distribute binaries because it does not make sense to delay the release of source code only because there are no binaries; and it does not make sense to delay the release of binaries for a platform with faster builders only because there are no binaries yet on other platforms.  However the natural and inevitable time lag between a released source package and a working binary package (which is what most users are looking forward to) is likely to be reduced for most platforms.

First to respond to my call was Matthew Petroff.  He made Windows binaries in four variations (32bit/64bit, installer and standalone zipped) available within a few hours and before anybody else.  Matthew has joined the team recently and he has done some excellent polishing work on the Windows side of thing.

Then the indefatigable Harry van der Wolf followed up.  Building for OSX is always a little bit different/special and require more effort than most other platforms.  He reported this morning that everything works and will produce the coveted bundle installer tomorrow.  What would Hugin Mac users do without Harry?

Andreas Metzler reported a “work for me” update to the Debian experimental source package.  Based on his work I will try to produce my first Ubuntu packages of Hugin for Ubuntu Lucid (my main system) and Jaunty (chrooted), and Gerry Patterson will tag-team for Maverick.

On the Fedora front things are quiet but not less up to date.  Between Bruno Postle and Terry Duell recent versions of Fedora should be covered soon.

Lukáš Jirkovský will try to use OpenSuSE Build Service, but he’s very busy and there is no guarantee.

No promises.  There is always an inevitable lag between the release of a source tarball and that of a usable binary – at minimum the time it takes for the builder to download the tarball, build it, run a minimal test, and publish it.  But we are doing our best to make this the Hugin release with the shortest delay from source to binary.

This weekend is a test run.  The really interesting run will be when we approach the final release.  Keep your champagne cold for now.

And when will somebody report success building Hugin on Android or iOS?