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Hugin 2010.4.0 Officially Released

Today I declared the Hugin build released a few days ago final. It is dedicated to Milko K. Amorth, a pioneer of the full spherical panoramic photography that we have lost last year under tragic circumstances.  He will be missed.

This release of Hugins brings a load of new features.  The two most notable are the result of two Google Summer of Code (GSoC) 2010 projects:

The built in control point generator cpfind was the is the GSoC project of Antoine Deleforge, built on top of more than three years of contributions made by too many people to list here.  For the first time Hugin is “feature complete”.  This does not mean that there are no new features coming.  It only means that it is now possible to run the typical stitching workflow end-to-end without relying on third party non-Free packages.

The new underlying controller, Makefilelib, the GSoC project of Florian Achleitner.  Users of the GUI won’t notice, but it enables a more robust stitching process, distribution on multiple stitching nodes, finer grained control and extension of the process through other third party tools controlled by the same Makefile.

More information in the release notes.

Another first: the user-community around Hugin is growing and the user-contributed binaries are already available or will be available shortly after the source code release.  Many Thanks to everybody who has contributed to this great release cycle, particularly to Matthew Petroff for the Windows builds and to Harry van der Wolf for the OSX builds.

Thinking In The Round

Panorama photographers take pictures of the inside of the imaginary sphere surrounding them. With tools like Hugin they recompose the sphere from the individual photos. Then the sphere is reprojected to the viewer, creating an almost infinite quantity of perspectives. My friend Milko draw my attention to this movie of artist Dick Termes who does what we would call full spherical panoramas… with a brush. Inspiring.